Writing For Video Games


Do video games need writers as well as programmers? Traditionally, video games have been a linear experience based on skill and entertainment rather than storytelling. They are  firmly steeped in the realm of fantasy and were once a simple matter of killing gremlins or shooting things before they killed you. Video games are becoming increasingly more…

More On Pitching


Doug Eboch and Ken Aguado, co-authors of “The Hollywood Pitching Bible”, discuss the key components of a successful pitch. Most pitches range from 15 seconds to 15 minutes long and they are often delivered in an unstructured, spontaneous environment. The key to delivering an effective pitch is to have a compelling idea with a strong…

Creating A Powerful Hero


According to The Scriptlab, the most important character in your screenplay is your protagonist: your hero. Without them, there is no story. Good stories are about character growth and change. 1) CREATE AN INTERESTING PROTAGONIST YOUR AUDIENCE WILL HOPE AND FEAR FOR When creating your hero, audience connection is key. Your hero needs to be…

The Importance Of Symbols In Stories


John Fraim discusses the role of symbology in storytelling. The simple definition of a symbol is something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention, especially a material object used to represent something invisible. For example, a lion is a symbol for courage, and a flag a symbol of patriotism. Then there’s color symbology….

Creating Memorable Characters


Hayley McKenzie aka Script Angel discusses the importance of writing characters audiences connect with. When we remember out favorite movies it’s usually the characters we remember first.  Think Gone With The Wind and you think of Scarlett O’Hara, Star Wars and you think Darth Vader. Think Silence of the Lambs and you think Hannibal Lecter.  Pirates of the Caribbean is Jack Sparrow.  Wizard of Oz and you…

Why Can’t I Sell My Screenplay?


Staton Robin from Script Magazine discusses some common conceptions and misconceptions writers have about selling their screenplays. Yes, the industry’s tough. All you can do is be aware of the industry and improve your craft. Persistent complaining has never resulted in a sales. Executives don’t write checks after you’ve worn them down. The good news…

Emotional Elements Of A Plot


Martha Alderson, author of  “The Plot Whisperer”  discusses the importance of the emotional development of your story. Dramatic action creates the pace of a story and determines the level of story excitement. The thematic significance reveals the meaning of the piece. An emotional connection is fused between the viewer and the story through the character…

Why A Screenplay Is Different To Other Literary Forms


Many screenwriters don’t appreciate the differences between literary formats. Newer writers often feel that they are interchangeable and being proficient in one literary form automatically qualifies them to transition into screenwriting. Screenplays tend to be more functional documents which are interpreted and experienced by a movie’s cast and crew in different ways. How is a screenplay different?…

Distorting Reality In Movies


Brad Johnson, from Script Magazine discusses how characters perpetuate their own interpretation of the truth in movies. Sometimes this is an outright lie, but often it’s a severe distortion of reality. Every story is told from the perspective of a specific character, but what if that character doesn’t see reality clearly? Most unreliable narrators come…

How To Create A Memorable Villain


Danny Manus, chief story consultant of nobullscript.net discusses creating compelling and interesting protagonists – is creating compelling and interesting antagonists. Your antagonist needs to be almost as emotionally complex as your hero. Simply wanting to thwart the protagonist isn’t interesting enough. List 5 important character traits, how those traits are exemplified in your plot, how…

Why Your First Ten Pages Count


Erik Bork, script consultant says that a writer might only get the opening pages of their script read — and that it will likely be put down right away if those pages don’t immediately engage the busy industry professional who has given it a chance by opening it. Most screenwriters who have been at it…

50 Shades Of An Amateur Writer


As defined by Daniel Manus, script consultant: Writing CUT TOs, FADE TOs, FADE OUTs, or any other transitions between every scene. Telling us instead of showing us. Description is in past tense instead of present tense and does not use the active form of the verb. For example, John drives – not John is driving….